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Stranger Heightened Awareness Response ProgramTM
Be SHARP! Be AWARE!

Twelve Ways To Sharpen Stranger Awareness

“Do’s” and “Don’ts” for Staying Safe! A Martial Arts for Peace Life Skills for Kids Program TM

Lesson 1: Do Be Aware

Act on Your Feeling That Something May Be Dangerous!

Ask students the following questions. Encourage them to give you quick, alert, but brief answers! You only have 15 minutes per lesson!

  • What does it mean to be “aware”?
  • Does being aware mean you are observant? Focused on what’s going on around you? Living in the moment?
  • What’s one way you were aware today?
  • What does it feel like to be aware? Is it hard work? Does it take practice to stay “in the moment” rather than worrying about what happened yesterday or what might happen tomorrow?
  • Does being aware make you feel strong? If so, in what way?

Tell students:

  • Sometimes we get a sense that something near us may be dangerous.
  • That “awareness” usually appears for a good reason. Pay attention to it!
  • It’s good to be aware all the time, but when you’re in an unfamiliar area, or talking with suspicious strangers, it’s especially important.
  • The voice inside us that tells us to beware is usually right! Listen to it! Focus! Be aware!

Activity 1: Exercise

I Am Alive!

Ask students:

  1. One way to practice being aware is to challenge your senses! Do you know what your five senses are? (Give students time to respond.) Are they sight, sound, smell, taste and touch?
  2. When you walk down the street, are you aware of what’s in your line of vision? Do you really look at what’s on the street, who is on the street, and what’s going on?
  3. Do you listen to sounds — the birds in the trees, an airplane or helicopter in the sky, people talking, horns honking? Are you aware of any aromas or stenches — garbage, or flowers, or gas?

Tell students:

  1. Let’s sit, right where we are (if the weather is good, take students outside). Sit comfortably, close your eyes and just LISTEN. For two whole minutes, sit as quietly as you can and do nothing but LISTEN. (Whisper:) On your mark, get set, go.
  2. (After two minutes:) Let’s open our eyes now and just LOOK. Don’t move from where you’re sitting but, as quietly as you can, just LOOK around you. Say nothing, but NOTICE what you see.

Ask students:

  1. By sitting quietly with your eyes closed, did you notice any sound that you don’t normally notice? What did you hear?
  2. By sitting quietly and looking around, did you notice any sight that you don’t normally notice? What did you observe?
  3. How do you think you could practice being “aware” — when you’re at home, at school, or out in the world? Does this activity help?
  4. Do you think your family would be amazed if you suddenly “noticed” something good they do, and mentioned it to them? Would your brother or sister pass out in disbelief if you observed something they never knew that you noticed? Want to try it? It could be fun to show friends and family your new powers of observation!

Lesson 2: Don't Talk With a Stranger

Ignore a Suspicious Stranger

When the Situation Doesn’t Feel Right!

Ask students the following questions. Encourage them to give fast, but observant answers! It’s important for them to think quickly, on their feet! But limit their answers so you can finish on time.

  • Did you “notice” new things about any friends or family this week? Did you try last week’s exercise on them? What happened?
  • How do you think you ought to apply your new awareness to strangers?
  • Do you think it’s a good idea to talk with any stranger who approaches you? Why do you think so?
  • Do you think you are always able to distinguish between a stranger who intends to do harm, and one who doesn’t? How can you tell?
  • Is it important to ignore a suspicious stranger — get away from a suspicious stranger — when a situation does not feel right? Do you think that your “instinct,” your “awareness,” your “inner voice” sometimes tells you when a situation doesn’t feel right?

Tell students:

  • Knowing when to ignore a suspicious stranger gives us a great sense of power.
  • This feeling of power comes from using our brains instead of ourfists.
  • Our Mental Self-Defense™ strength increases as we learn how to use our awareness to help us feel strong and, therefore, act in ways that can be more powerful than anything we do with our fists.

Activity 2: Exercise

Stranger Awareness!

✓ BEFORE CLASS, write these column zones on the board, or make a copy for each student.

Stranger Awareness Zones!

Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3
MILD! MEDIUM! HOT!
Be friendly
Use humor
Be clever
Walk away
Use reason
Agree with stranger
Ignore threats
Refuse to go
Stand up to stranger
Call an authority
Shout at stranger
Take a stance

✓ Tell students: Here are three Stranger Awareness Zones that could help you deal with a stranger who might be dangerous! Zone 1 has some mildmannered, gentle approaches, if the danger level feels low. Zone 2 approaches are more energetic, if something tells you there is danger! Zone 3 approaches are the most aggressive, and can be used when you feel certain that danger is on the rise, and you’re going to have to deal with it.

✓ Read through EACH ZONE, then encourage quick, alert responses:

  1. If you were approached by a stranger, and unsure whether there was danger, would you: Try to make friends? Use humor or be clever, to throw the stranger off guard? Walk away, as quickly as you can?
  2. Do you think that being friendly, using humor, or being clever can throw a stranger off-guard and give you more time to keep your distance, or get away?
  3. If you agree with a stranger, ignore the stranger’s threats, refuse to go with a stranger — all the time keeping your distance, preparing to run away — is this a good strategy to use when you suspect there might be danger? Which of the “hot” responses would work best for you, if you believe the danger level is high? Standing up to the stranger? Calling for help? Screaming loudly, “Leave me alone!”? Preparing to fight the stranger?

Lesson 3: DO Shout “Leave Me Alone!”

Shout “I Don’t Know You!” to a Bothersome Stranger

IMPORTANT: BEFORE CLASS, MAKE TWO COPIES OF ROLEPLAY ON THE NEXT PAGE!

Ask students the following questions. Encourage rapid, brief responses!

  • Do you think it’s important to know that when you shout, “Leave me alone!” or “I don’t know you!” — you are not being a coward?
  • Do you think it’s important to understand that shouting these words, to a stranger who might be planning something dangerous, might stop the stranger from doing harm?
  • Do you think that shouting at a stranger might throw the stranger offbalance, and stop violence before it starts?

Tell students:

  • Lots of people “hang around” our schools and communities. We know some of them, and others we don’t know as well. Sometimes people who “hang around” do so to make themselves familiar to us, so that we begin to trust them.
  • It’s smart to be on guard, to be ready to take action, in the event a “familiar” person tries to take you somewhere, or attempts to hurt you.
  • Strangers who intend to do harm are sometimes very clever. They might say, “Would you help me look for my lost puppy?” or “Would you show me how to get to the school?” or “Your mother is in trouble; let me take you to her.”
  • It’s sad that there are such people who will say these things in order to get their way, but the fact is — they do exist, and we need to be aware, in case we’re the ones they’re talking to.
  • Let’s get two Volunteers to read a roleplay. Who wants to volunteer? (Give each student a copy of the roleplay on the next page.)

Activity 3: Roleplay

“I Don’t Know You!”

✓ BEFORE CLASS, make TWO PHOTOCOPIES of the roleplay on the following page.

✓ Ask for two Volunteers to play the parts of STRANGER and DALE.

  • Remind Volunteers that words in parentheses ( ) are directions to the Volunteer and should not be read out loud.
  • Tell Volunteers to get into their parts and to have fun with the roleplay!

Download Roleplay

✓ DO ROLEPLAY!

✓ AFTER ROLEPLAY, thank the Volunteers. Leave enough time to ask the following questions! Always encourage students to think quickly, on their feet, and to respond with whatever thoughts enter their minds.

  1. Were there any indications that this stranger meant to do harm? Was Dale imagining it all?
  2. Did Dale make use of any of the Stranger Awareness Zone skills? If so, which do you notice? Did Dale use humor, reason, cleverness?
  3. Do you think the stranger intended harm? Were you able to know for certain?
  4. Do you think that Dale wasn’t sure but perhaps “felt” uncomfortable?
  5. Do you think Dale heard, saw, or became aware of something that signaled possible danger?
  6. What do you think it was that made Dale feel that way?
  7. If you were in that situation, how would you handle it?

✓ Thank Volunteers and other students for their good work.


Lesson 4: DON’T Be Afraid to Say “No, Thanks.”

Walk Away from a Stranger Who Wants You to Follow!

Ask students the following questions. Be sure to limit the discussion time so that you can get the whole lesson done in 15 minutes!

  • Do you sometimes find it difficult to say no to people?
  • What makes it difficult to say no? When you’re talking to someone with “authority”? Someone older? Apparently stronger? More demanding?
  • Do you think it’s important to practice saying no, so that we are good at saying no if we’re ever approached by a stranger who does not have good intentions?

Tell students:

  • Learning how to say, “No, thanks,” is particularly important. Especially when we’re talking to people we don’t know.
  • The point is that we need to develop the mental strength to say “No thanks” when we sense that what we’re being asked to do isn’t right.
  • Any suspicious stranger who invites us to follow — out of the home, out of the school yard, into a car, into a new area — for whatever reason! — needs to be told, “No, thanks.”
  • It’s important to not be afraid to say no, especially when our instincts tell us that saying no is the only right thing to do!

Activity 4: A Mental Freestyle

All the Ways to Say No!

✓ BEFORE CLASS, make ONE PHOTOCOPY of the following page.

Download Strip Questions

✓ Cut the page into strips, then fold the strips, so no one can see what they say, and put them into a hat or bowl. Make sure there are enough strips for everyone. You can make more than one copy of each, or be creative, and make up some strips of your own!

✓ In class, ask students to form a circle. They may stand or sit.

✓ Ask for a Volunteer to pick one strip out of the hat or bowl.

  • Ask the Volunteer to open the strip and say whatever the strip says. The Volunteer must give a quick, short response!
  • Then, ask that Volunteer to stand in front of another student, offer the bowl or hat of strips, and ask that student’s to pick and say whatever question is on the strip of paper. Allow student responses to be serious or funny. The subject matter can be “touchy,” and we want students to be able to respond any way they like. What matters is that they answer quickly and spontaneously!

✓ Continue until all students have had a chance to respond! But you’ll have to move fast!

✓ Don’t forget to congratulate students on their good work!


Lesson 5: DO Tell a Trusted Adult

Tell a Reliable Adult If a Stranger Is Bothering You!

Ask students the following questions. Encourage them to respond quickly and attentively! They’re learning to think quickly, on their feet!

  • In today’s world, do you think it’s sometimes difficult to tell trustworthy people from people who are not?
  • What does it mean to be “trustworthy”? What are the characteristics of a person you can trust? Is it usually someone you know well?
  • Who are the five most trustworthy people in your life? Can you name them? You don’t have to name them out loud, but you should know who they are, just in case you have to call upon them.
  • Do you think that most of us are brought up to be kind to people, and that sometimes it’s hard to believe that not all people are kind?

Tell students:

  • For stranger awareness, it’s good to practice what we would do if approached by a stranger who bothers us.
  • The first thing to do is to think of one person you trust — the person you would contact first if you were in danger. This kind of thinking enhances your Mental Self-Defense™ skills and strengthens your brain!
  • Our number one martial arts goal is always to stop conflict before it starts. With that in mind, let’s focus on the best way to stop conflict that could be caused by a stranger bothering you!

Activity 5: Roleplay

Who Do You Trust?

✓ BEFORE CLASS, make TWO PHOTOCOPIES of the roleplay on the following page.

Download Roleplay

✓ Ask for two Volunteers to play the parts of MRS. SAVION and WALKER.
! Tell Volunteers that words in parentheses ( ) are directions to the

  • Volunteer and should not be read out loud.
  • Suggest to Volunteers that they really try to get into their parts and have fun with the roleplay!

✓ DO ROLEPLAY!

✓ AFTER ROLEPLAY, thank the Volunteers. Leave enough time to ask the following questions! Always encourage students to think quickly, on their feet, and to respond honestly about what they think.

  1. Do you think Mrs. Savion was really interested in helping Walker?
  2. What makes you think so?
  3. Do you think Walker trusted this teacher?
  4. What do you think made Walker trust Mrs. Savion?
  5. Do you think Walker heard, saw, or became aware of anything that signaled possible danger?
  6. If it’s an adult that was bothering Walker, do you think Walker might find it difficult to tell another adult about it?
  7. How would you have handled this situation?

✓ Thank Volunteers and other students for their good work.


Lesson 6: DON’T Accept Gifts

Never Accept Presents from Suspicious Strangers!

Ask students the following questions. Do your best to motivate them to respond as quickly and honestly as they can! But limit the answers.

  • Do you like to get presents?
  • Do you think you would ever accept a present from someone you don’t know?
  • Would it be difficult to say no to a stranger who gives you a big box of chocolate candy?
  • Do you think it would be very wise to not accept the box of candy? Why do you think so?
  • None of us likes to think about it, but do you think it’s possible that someone with bad intentions might add something to candy before giving it away?
  • Do you go “trick or treating” for Halloween? If so, is the candy you get always from people you know — or people you know that are well intentioned? How do you know?

Tell students:

  • Someone might try to give you candy, or take your picture and offer to give it to you as a present, or offer you a box when you don’t know the contents of the box.
  • It’s awful to have to be wary of gifts people give us, but as the saying goes, “It’s better to be safe than sorry.” All we’re trying to do is keep everyone safe!
  • One of the most powerful defenses we have is awareness! When we are aware that a gift might be dangerous, we are prepared!
  • Talk through the chart on the next page. Photocopy and enlarge it! Keep adding to it, on an ongoing basis!

Activity 6: An Activity

Stranger AWARENESS Gifts!

Here is a list of possible stranger-awareness gift situations in which a stranger might offer you a gift. Ask your friends, family, adults and other people for suggestions and ideas to add to this chart. Keep adding to this chart!

  1. While shopping at the mall, a stranger offers to give you a free backpack.
  2. In a movie theater, a stranger says he bought too much candy and offers you some.
  3. In the schoolyard, a “delivery person” gives you a package for one of the teachers and asks you to carry it inside.
  4. Someone you don’t know says there’s a gift for you in the car, but you have to come and get it.
  5.  
  6.  
  7.  
  8.  
  9.  
  10.  

Lesson 7: DO Tell Adults Where You’re Going

Let Parents and Teachers Know Where You Are

Ask students the following questions. Remember to go after quick, immediate responses!

  • Do you always tell your parents and/or teachers where you’re going, when you leave their sight?
  • Is there any reason why you would not tell them where you’re going? What would those reasons be?
  • Would you be afraid that perhaps they might not approve of where you’re going? Or might worry about you?
  • Sometimes we like to feel independent and either forget or don’t want to let our parents or teachers know where we’re going. As much as you don’t like to do it, can you think of one reason why it’s safer not to tell them than to tell them?

Tell students:

  • The world today is more dangerous than it use to be. There have always been people around with bad intentions, but there seem to be more of them these days.
  • It’s smart to always ask permission to leave the schoolyard or play area, or to go into someone’s home.
  • It’s always smart to let parents know where you are and when you’re expected back.
  • One way to prevent conflict from brewing is to keep the people you know best informed about where you are and what you’re doing. That way, if you need help, they know where to find you.

Activity 7: A Mental Freestyle

Trust Your Intuition!

✓ Tell Students:

  • I’m going to toss a question — one at a time — at each of you. Your job is to answer immediately, quickly! What makes this game fun is to fire away with fast, intuitive answers! This is a mental freestyle, so respond quickly! (Use the questions below — it’s okay to repeat them — or make up some of your own!)
  • There are no right or wrong answers, so you have nothing to lose! Act from your clear, focused mind! If something funny or crazy or bizarre comes out, enjoy it! The point is to say it as it is.
  • Trust your intuition!

✓ Ask Students:

  1. Why do you think it’s a good idea to talk with any stranger who approaches you?
  2. How can you distinguish between a stranger who intends to do harm, and one who doesn’t?
  3. Can you think of a time when a person you don’t know made you feel “uncomfortable”? When was that?
  4. Can you remember meeting or seeing someone and immediately thinking, “This person is dangerous.”? When was that?
  5. When is it appropriate to say no?
  6. When is it NOT appropriate to say no?
  7. Is there an advantage in telling a trusted adult a problem you’re having? If so, name one.
  8. Are there disadvantages in telling a trusted adult about a problem you’re having? If so, name one.

✓ Thank your students for their willingness to trust their intuition!


Lesson 8: DON’T Get Into a Stranger’s Car

Never Go Anywhere With Someone You Don’t Know!

Encourage students to give you rapid-fire, alert answers to these questions! It’s important for them to think quickly, on their feet!

  • Is there a time when you would even consider getting into a stranger’s car?
  • Would it have to be an emergency of some kind? And how would you know the emergency is real?
  • Do you think that someone could trick you into getting into their car by using the names of people you know?
  • Would you ever consider going anywhere with someone you don’t know?

Tell students:

  • The way we think creates the way we feel, and the way we think and feel creates how we act.
  • If we think that a stranger has told us the truth, we will believe it, and possibly get into the stranger’s vehicle. If we are aware enough to question whether a stranger has told us the truth, we are prepared!
  • When we learn to think intelligently — to stop and consider the best approach to whatever we’re going to do next — we develop our Mental Self-Defense™ skills and get mentally stronger!
  • If we practice thinking, “I will never, ever get into a stranger’s car,” then we won’t!

Activity 8: Roleplay

“Get in the Car!”

✓ BEFORE CLASS, make TWO PHOTOCOPIES of the roleplay on the following page.

Download Roleplay

✓ Ask for two Volunteers to play the parts of LANE and CAMPBELL.

  • Remind Volunteers that words in parentheses ( ) are directions to the Volunteer and should not be read out loud.
  • Suggest to the Volunteers that they get into their parts and have fun with the roleplay!

✓ DO ROLEPLAY!

✓ AFTER ROLEPLAY, thank the Volunteers. Leave enough time to ask a few short questions! Encourage students to think quickly, on their feet, and to respond with whatever thoughts enter their minds.

  1. What do you think? Did Campbell’s mother really get into an accident?
  2. Can we tell from this roleplay what actually happened?
  3. Do you think Campbell knew for certain what happened?
  4. How do you think Campbell responded to Lane’s offers to help?
  5. Do you think Lane was sincere?
  6. Were there any danger signs?
  7. How would you have handled that situation?

✓ Thank Volunteers and other students for their good work.


Lesson 9: Go to a Safe Zone

Go Where You Know There’s Protection!

Ask students the following questions and, once again, encourage them to give you quick, alert answers. Remember, you have only 15 minutes!

  • What does it mean to be “safe”? When do you feel safe?
  • Do you feel protected at home? In your room? In your classroom? In your community? In your martial arts school?
  • What’s the safest place you can think of?

Tell students:

  • In today’s world, places we think of as safe aren’t always!
  • That’s why it’s good to think about a variety of “safe” places — places you might want to go to, if you ever found yourself in some kind of danger.
  • Think of one place, right now, that you believe is safe.
  • Ask yourself what makes this a “safe” place.
  • In a fire, or in an earthquake, being inside your home is not always the safest place — so it might be helpful to think of some good, alternate locations!

Activity 9: My Safest Place!

BEFORE CLASS, make TWO PHOTOCOPIES of the roleplay on the following two pages.

Download Roleplay

✓ Ask for two Volunteers to play the parts of SIMPSON and KARLIN.

  • Remind Volunteers that it’s good to really get into their parts and to read their lines with enthusiasm!
  • Tell Volunteers to have fun!

DO ROLEPLAY!

AFTER ROLEPLAY, thank the Volunteers. Ask the following questions and, as always, encourage students to think quickly, on their feet, and to respond with whatever thoughts enter their minds.

  1. What did you think about Karlin and Simpson’s choices for safe places?
  2. Would these “safe” places work for you, in your neighborhood?
  3. What do you think of their idea of making a chart to put up at school, at home and in certain places in the community?
  4. Do you think it might be helpful to make a chart for the people you know, in your home or school?
  5. What are some of the safest places you know?

✓ Thank Volunteers and class for their good work.


Lesson 10: Go Alone Into Dangerous Areas

Stay Away from Deserted Houses and Dark Alleys!

Ask students the following questions. Encourage them to think clearly and effectively — but fast!

  • Do you sometimes see or read the news and think, “I’m so fortunate that has not happened to me”?
  • Do you take a hard look at how these things DID happen to these people?
  • Have you sometimes heard that someone walked through a dark alleyway alone, or ran through a large park at night — and was attacked?
  • Do you sometimes think that these things could never happen to you? Do you feel confident, strong, invincible?
  • No matter how strong you are, how much martial arts you’ve studied, and how smart you may be, do you think that everyone is basically vulnerable, at one time or another?

Tell students:

  • The phrase “Better safe than sorry” makes good sense! Whenever you find yourself in a place where you do not feel safe, it’s good to stop and think for a moment about your next step.
  • You never want to walk through dark alleys, poorly lit parks or deserted areas — especially when you’re by yourself.
  • You never want to go into a deserted house, day or night – especially when you’re by yourself.
  • The more we think about dangerous places to avoid, and safe places to go, the more our Mental Self-Defense™ skills are strengthened. Let’s think!

Activity 10: Exercise

Dangerous Areas!

✓ Ask students to calmly sit in a circle and close their eyes. Ask them to think silently about the most dangerous place they can think of. (Give them half a minute.)

✓ Then ask students to open their eyes and ask, “Who wants to tell the most dangerous place they can imagine?”

✓ Ask students:

  1. What makes this place so dangerous?
  2. Is there any time of the day or night when it would be okay to go to this place?
  3. What kind of risk would you be taking to go to this place with a friend?
  4. Do you think it would be helpful to let other people know that they ought to stay away from this place?
  5. What do you think would be the best way to inform people you know about the danger of this place?
  6. Are there any people you know who hang out in this place, even though they are aware that it’s risky?
  7. Are there any people you know who hang out in this place, who do not know that they may be putting themselves in jeopardy by being there?
  8. Do you think that it’s always better to be safe than sorry?

✓ Congratulate students on their excellent Mental Self-Defense™ work!


Lesson 11: DO Trust Your Gut Feelings

Listen to the Voice Inside Your Head!

Ask students the following questions. Keep the lesson only 15 minutes!

  • When we are in trouble, do you think we tend to panic and not always use our best common sense?
  • Do you think that sometimes our “inner” voice may be shouting at us and we don’t hear, because we’re afraid, or unbalanced?
  • Is it your opinion that our “inner” voice is our gut feelings trying to give us some good advice?

Tell students:

  • It’s important to respect our gut feelings. Those feelings are not just wild or crazy thoughts running rampantly through our heads! Those feelings are based on our instinct, which is doing its best to give us some important advice!
  • We tend to ignore our instinct, because it comes from a place inside us that we’re not always used to listening to.
  • More often than not, our gut feelings are accurate. They are like built-in signs or warning bells, signaling us to pay attention.
  • Trust your gut feelings!

Activity 11: A Mental Freestyle

I’m Listening to That Voice!

✓ Ask students to sit or stand in a circle, as comfortably as they can.

✓ Tell them that this is a mental freestyle, designed to strengthen their Mental Self-Defense™ skills and that they must respond with bright, fun, intuitive answers! Remind them that:

  • There are no right or wrong answers!
  • The point is to be quick and fearless!
  • It’s good to empty yourself of old thinking!
  • It’s important to trust your instinct!

✓ Go around the room many times, as many as you wish, firing the questions that appear on the following pages. You’re always invited to make up some of your own that you know are appropriate for your students. It’s okay to re-use the questions over and over again, because different students will have different responses.

✓ Go around more than once so there is an ongoing movement of questions to keep students “on their toes.”

✓ Afterward, congratulate students on their fine work!

Questions

  1. A stranger walks up to you and wants to show you some great stuff he has for sale in his car. Your instinct tells you to:
  2. Someone you’ve seen around the neighborhood but don’t know very well knocks on your door, says his car is stalled and asks to use your telephone. Your instinct tells you to:
  3. A person you’ve never seen before is following you down the street, and you sense that you are going to be attacked. Your instinct tells you to:
  4. You’re invited to a last-minute party at the home of a classmate. You’re not sure who else is going to be there. You’re trying to decide whether to call home and let everyone know where you’ll be, or not. Your instinct tells you to:
  5. A clown on the street is passing out candy to all the kids. You take the candy and you’re about to unwrap it. Your instinct tells you to:
  6. There’s been an explosion in your house, and a fire has started. Your instinct tells you to:
  7. You’re in a neighborhood that’s not your own, and you’re heading home when a car of teenagers stops and begins to follow you down the street. Your instinct tells you to:
  8. You’ve just moved to a new house and haven’t yet memorized your telephone number. You need to call someone at home. Your instinct tells you to:
  9. A group of kids is following you down the street. You think that if you run, they will probably run after you. Still, you don’t want to let them catch up to you. Your instinct tells you to:
  10. You are a very trusting person, and you tend to believe everything people tell you. Someone you don’t know that well tells you that you’d better hurry and get in the car, because someone in your family has been hurt, and this person will get you there quickly. Your instinct tells you to:

Lesson 12: DON’T Distrust All Strangers

Many Strangers Are Good People!

When you ask your students the following questions, keep in mind that this is the last segment – make it the best one! Remind students that there are no “right” or “wrong” answers — only honest ones!

  • Do you think we should distrust all strangers, no matter who they are? Are all strangers dangerous?
  • What do you think is the best way to distinguish a kind stranger from a menacing stranger?
  • Do you think we should trust our instinct all the time, no matter what it tells us?
  • What is the most important thing you think you’ve learned from becoming more aware of strangers?
  • Do you think you’ve developed your stranger awareness? In what way?
  • Do you think you’ve strengthened your Mental Self-Defense™ skills? In what way?

✓ Divide students into groups of three or four. Then, tell students:

  • Let’s say that you’ve been inducted into the local Police Department.
  • Your job is to come up with safety tips for kids and to go around to schools to help students learn more about stranger awareness and what they can do to live as safely as possible.

✓ Ask students to freely share their thoughts, their ideas in their groups — to not be afraid to say what they think. Give the groups five minutes to come up with their ideas. Ask them to write them down quickly!

✓ After five minutes, call time. Ask each group to quickly report their findings to the rest.

✓ After all groups have reported, tell students:

  • You’ve come up with some fine ideas. Congratulations on your good work! It’s been a pleasure to have you with us!
  • There are other classes we offer, that are longer, more involving, where you can learn even more!
  • Next time, bring a friend!
  • We’ll see you soon!

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